Tag Archives: March for science

Earth Day 2017 – A global/national/local movement!

Earth Day, Sunday, April 22, 2017 is a celebration of our magnificent planet and a call to those who share this earth to both appreciate and protect this earthly heritage.  In wise and wonderful ways earthlings are embracing the challenge.  A mere sampling of Earth Day happenings!

These articles from Common Dreams describe the global context in which concerned scientists and citizens are taking initiative at the national, state and local levels.

Earth Day, Sunday, April 22, 2017 is a celebration of this magnificent planet and a call to those who share this earth to both appreciate and protect our earthly heritage.  In wise and wonderful ways earthlings are embracing the challenge.  A mere sampling of Earth Day happenings:

These articles from Common Dreams describe the global context in which concerned scientists and citizens are taking initiative at the national, state and local levels.

https://www.commondreams.org/views/2017/04/20/peoples-climate-changing-directions-its-too-late

https://www.commondreams.org/news/2017/04/20/fight-our-future-march-science-rallies-planned-worldwide

In this country, the Earth Day March for Science set for Washington, DC has been well covered by the media.  More important, the March for Science has morphed into a network of state and local marches.  An earlier post about the Minnesota March for Science suggests some relevant links:   (https://marytreacy.wordpress.com/tag/march-for-science/)

Earth Day has also inspired countless local initiatives.  The buzz in my Northeast Minneapolis community is the Earth Day 5K Bee Run/Walk and Earth Day River Cleanup. Yes, there is a run/walk – on-site registration at 7:30 with the 5K beginning at 9:00 AM.  Sponsored by the Great River Coalition, the run/walk is just one of several events that will be happening along the Mississippi on Earth Day.

Another goal of the day is to create a pollinator pathway along the Mississippi River.  The local effort is part of a national movement to save the bee population by creating a healthy habitat for the bees.  In the words of U of M entomologist, Dr. Marla Spivak, “our bees (all of them, honey and wild bees), need good clean food (flowers)! Lots of flowers that grow over the growing season will help bees have good nutrition, immunity, and health.”

Minnesota Native Landscapes will also be on hand with pollinator-friendly plants, seeds, local origin perennial plants, native wildflowers and grasses.  There will be prizes galore and, best of all, native plant experts to answer questions!

Details:

  • Registration opens at 7:30 AM  ($40 on race day, kids 6 and under free)
  • Fun Run/Walk starts at 9:00 AM
  • River cleanup starts at 9:30 AM – bags and gloves will be provided
  • The Run/Walk/River Cleanup will wrap up @12:30

Follow the day on Facebook @ greatrivercoalition.com/events

 

March for Science – Minnesotans march to protest federal cuts

When I first posted mention of the March for Science a couple of months ago both the date and the concept seemed remote.  In recent weeks we have all learned more than we want to know about the  horrendous cuts to federal funding for science – everything from EPA to NIH to NOAA and more (https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/16/climate/trump-budget-science-research.html?_r=0)

As a community and as a nation we experience the imperative to resist in a public way, to speak out, to stand up – and to march – essentially to remind ourselves and our nation that science matters. On Saturday, April 22, Earth Day 2017, thousands of Americans will gather in Washington, DC for a march not unlike the Women’s March in January – only warmer.

As with the Women’s March there will be satellite marches throughout the nation.  In Minnesota, a coalition of individuals from all walks of life will gather to march to the State Capitol.  Promoters of the Minnesota March say that these teachers, researchers, librarians, students, nonprofits, labor unions and faith groups share a common mission to (in the words of my high school teacher) “combat ignorance.”

The March will start at Cathedral Hill Park at 11:AM ( https://goo.gl/maps/dRjQxoPqS6Q2) with a Noon rally at the State Capitol. Marchers are encouraged to wear blue and green.  (Unlike the Women’s March, parkas, thermal underwear and boots are optional)

Learn much more here:  http://www.MarchForScienceMN.com/march

Minnesotans have a unique opportunity to learn and think about the mission of the March through a series sponsored by the East Side Freedom Library in St. Paul.  All are welcome to participate in the April 8 Solidarity Saturday: Science, Not Silence discussions:  http://eastsidefreedomlibrary.org/event/solidarity-saturdays-science-not-silence/

The web offers a wealth of information about the March – background, mission, examples of proposed and current budget  cuts, and why science matters more than ever.

One source of particular relevance is PLOS, a “peer-reviewed open access scientific journal published by the Public Library of Science. It’s a great – and accessible – update on what’s happening in the world of science.  A recent op-ed by PLOS co-founder Harold Varmus, explores “why Trump’s NIH cuts should worry us,” Another PLOS post by Judith Reichel speaks to the relevance of the March, “Standing up for science – Now more than ever.”  More about PLOS here.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PLOS_ONE

Among other resources I enjoyed are book reviews of a current popular read entitled “Rigor Mortis: How sloppy science creates worthless cures, crushes hope, and wastes billions.   Though I have yet to read the book, the reviews motivate me to dip into what seems to be accessible to this lowly liberal arts major who knows little but cares mightily about the ongoing attacks on science.

Planners provide many options for keeping abreast of and engaged in plans for the Minnesota March for Science:

Email: info@MarchForScienceMN.com
Facebook: /MarchForScienceMN
Instagram: @MarchForScienceMN
Twitter: @ScienceMarchMN
Snapchat: @ScienceMarchMN

Marchers will support research, science, real facts

It’s hard to specify the “tipping point.” It could have been the fact that the President considers climate change “a hoax”; or it could have been the gag orders issued to federal agencies; or maybe it was funding cuts for scientific research; or the team of researchers, archivists and librarians rushing to preserve essential scientific records. For many non-scientists it was simply the challenge to comprehend the concept of “alternative facts.”

Whatever the efficient cause, the effect is a planned March for Science – a march similar to the Women’s March, to be held in Washington, DC, in Europe, and in communities throughout the nation.

This is not to be a march of scientists but rather a March for Science. Planners describe a non-partisan march that “reaches far beyond people in the STEM fields and should concern anyone who values empirical research and science. “ Focus is on policy, including communication of findings from tax-funded research as well as funding for and nature of tax-funded research initiatives.   A fundamental premise of the initiative is that facts matter.

Details – including date – are in the works and should be out in the next few days. Meanwhile, stay informed – or get involved – through these channels:

Twitter: @ScienceMarchDC

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1862739727343189/

Reddit: /r/scientistsmarch

Get Email Updates

To help: https://goo.gl/forms/zAdY02dBEz3Ykii42

Contact: scientistsmarchonwashington@gmail.com

Who can participate? Anyone who values empirical science. That’s it. That’s the only requirement.

As a concerned non-scientist I’m eager to get instructions for gear that will appropriately represent the cause! Knitting needles are poised for action!

UPDATE:  http://www.commondreams.org/news/2017/01/25/war-facts-sparks-momentum-scientists-march-washington