Tag Archives: Cinco de Mayo

Spring thoughts of gardens, libraries & fresh ideas

Libraries are an attempt to impose order in a world of clues…They are places of redemption.  Stuart Kells

To appreciate a small selection of  library wonders, check these magnificent libraries https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/books-about-libraries-history or enjoy a virtual tour of some of the most beautiful “houses of literature here: https://twitter.com/i/moments/988539861127876608

Places to go, Things to do – a sampling

May 5 — Minnesotans will be celebrating with friends of Mexican descent the grand festival that is Cinco de Mayo.   The celebration will mean more for those who take time to learn a bit about the history and stories that shape the celebration.  History can offers an accessible primer on the how the celebration (which is not Mexico’s national holiday) came to be: https://www.history.com/topics/holidays/cinco-de-mayo  To learn more about happenings in this area, check this great guide to Cinco de Mayo: https://mailchi.mp/19c63e94fbfc/join-us-this-saturday-for-cinco-de-mayo

May 5 – Researching the history of your Minneapolis Home, 10;30-11:30 – Webber Park Library, 4440 North Humboldt in North Minneapolis.   An introduction to house history presented by experts from Minneapolis Central Library archives.

May 5 – Author Talk with Erik Riveness:   Dirty Doc Ames and the Scandal that Shook Minneapolis, Minneapolis Central Library, 2:00-3:00 PM

The first weekend of May explodes with energy and ideas generated by Heart of the Beast – Highlight of the celebration is the MayDay Parade, now in its 44thyear. Planners expect more than 50,000 people to fill the streets as participants and spectators.  Full details on May Day related events here:  https://hobt.org/mayday/

You know it really IS spring when it’s time for Art-a-Whirl, the celebration of the Northeast Minneapolis Arts Area.  For the 23rdseason AAW will be happening on every street and in every studio, library, and eatery throughout Northeast… It’s one of those events that defies description – you want to  be there, and you’ll want to tour more than once.    It’s May 15-18, open to all.  Check out the schedule of exhibits, activities and open studios as well as the logistics here: https:/emaa.org/art-a-whirl/

Starting on May 9th net neutrality activists and some sites will post “red alerts” to protest the FCC’s effort to roll back net neutrality protections.  More here: https://www.commondreams.org/news/2018/04/30/red-alert-net-neutrality-campaigners-announce-new-effort-overturn-fccs-assault-open To keep up with what’s happening on the net neutrality front, check this updated blog entry:  https://marytreacy.wordpress.com/2017/07/08/protecting-whats-ours-on-net-neutrality-day-of-action/

Again this year the American Craft Council Library is sponsoring the popular Library Salon series of presentations. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. with the conversation starting at 7:00.  For more information about the Library or the Library Salon Series contact the ACC at 612 206-3100 or library@craftcouncil.org  Forthcoming presentations include

* May 9 – “Reality is only a Rorschach inkblot, you know”, presented by Seattle artist Anna Miasowsky.  The artist will discuss how the many states of glass – its mutability, transformative character, and intangible materiality – have been her “alter ego.”  Mlasowsky will lead the group through her work and discuss what a material-based contemporary practice can express about our culture and perceptions.

* June 13 – Guest presenter is Dr. Heather Akou who will talk about “Creating African Fashion Histories.” Akou is associate professor of fashion design and merchandising in the School of Art, Architecture, and Design at Indiana University.  Also from the American Craft Council – Oral History Interviews with the Potters of the St. Croix River Valley – audio recordings, transcripts and photographs.  Details at www.bit.ly/accstcroix

Looking ahead – Thursday, May 24, marks the 30thAnnual Northeastern Minnesota Book Awards.  The grand celebration features keynote speaker William Kent Krueger and emcee Barton Sutter.  There’s a book fair and reception (5:00) followed by the Awards Ceremony * speaker and reception. Events take place at the Northland County Cub in Duluth.  Free and open (umn.edu/nemba or 218 726 7889)

Pew Research Center’s program on Religions & Public Life has produced and is making available a video entitled Being Muslim in the U.S. It’s a look inside the belies and attitudes of Muslims in America, based in part on data from Pew Research Centers 2017 survey as well as the personal stories of Muslims in the US.  The accompanying survey report is entitled “U.S. Muslims concerned about their place in society, but continue to believe in the American Dream.”  http://www.pewforum.org/2018/04/17/video-being-muslim-in-the-u-s/

Rise Up: The Movement that changed America, is a one-hour documentary from executive producers LeBron James and Maverick Carter.  The documentary follows the inner workings of legislative decisions that resulted, including the Montgomery Campaign, the Civil Rights and the Voting Rights Act.

PBS will launch the Great American Read with a two-hour episode on Tuesday, May 22. The series, hosted by TV personality and journalist Meredith Viera, will introduce viewers to PBS’s list of the country’s 100 favorite novels. Learn much more about the ambitious project here: (http://www.pbs.org/the-great-american-read/home/

Style note:  Atlas Obscura must have reveled in the opportunity to share the story of “girdle books.”  (now rendered obsolete by smart phones and podcasts)   Girdle books were small and light, wrapped in leather and carried like a purse. They are commonly depicted in paintings of Medieval bibliophiles.  Read more at https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/what-is-a-girdle-book)

Digital treasures:

The New York Academy of Medicine is celebrating the 20thanniversary of publication of J.K.Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by showcasing rare books and objects dating back to the 15thCentury.  The books and objects reveal the history behind many of the creatures, plants and other magical elements that appear in the Harry Potter Series.  https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/these-real-magical-texts-are-straight-out-of-harry-potter_us_59504de2e4b02734df2b33e9

The Newberry Libraryhas digitized their collection of early 20th Century Lakota drawings.  It’s an open access collection that, according to creators, “tells a curious history”.  The collection includes drawings by Sioux Indians, all images from the Edward E. Ayer Digital Collections.  Learn much more here: https://hyperallergic.com/438554/collection-of-early-20th-century-lakota-drawings/

Kudos:

Daniel Gullo, Eileen Smith, and David Calabro from the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library are recipients of the 2018 Minnesota Academic Innovators Award.  The trio have developed a method to establish new authorities for under-represented communities not commonly found in LC and VIAF authority files – e.g. authors and titles from early modern and medieval Eastern Christian and Islamic writers. The award is sponsored by several library associations’

The Library of Congress has announced that author E. Annie Proulx has been named recipient of the LC Prize for American Fiction.  Proulx is author of The Shipping News and Brokeback Mountainhttps://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/books/annie-proulx-wins-library-of-congress-prize-for-american-fiction/2018/05/01/fb6b3da6-4ca1-11e8-84a0-458a1aa9ac0a_story.html?utm_term=.d73ed5758b7a

Concerned that your carefully crafted turns of phrase will die aborning? Consider the story of “late bloomer” Zora Neale Hurston.  A mere 87 years after Hurston penned her novel The Last Black Cargo, Hurston, , who died in 1960, would no doubt be pleased to know that her masterpiece has been published, now renamed Barracoon (in some editions, The Last Black Cargo).  See “A long-unpublished book by Zora Neale Hurston” by Casey N. Cap, New Yorker, May 14, 2018 and https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2018/05/02/zora-neale-hurston-87-years-after-she-wrote-of-the-last-black-cargo-the-book-is-being-published/?utm_term=.ceb3f5178faat   

Forecast is turning 40!   In its four decades Forecast has emerged as pioneer in a growing movement of which Forecast is a powerful leader.  Public Art Review, published by Forecast, stands alone.  The 40thanniversary celebration will continue throughout the year, including a June TC’s Public Art Tour, Launch of Forecast’s Public Art Consulting Training Program and a 40thanniversary party and awards ceremony to be held next Fall.

The American Library Association has tapped Minnesota librarians Trent Brager (University of St. Thomas), Amy Mars (St. Catherine University), and Kim Pittman (University of Minnesota Duluth) for its 2018 Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Instruction Section (IS) Innovation award. The trio developed 23 Framework Things, an “academic librarian-focused, self-paced program [that] encourages participants to read, reflect, and respond to prompts and big questions surrounding the implementation of the [Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education] at their institutions.”  According to ALA, the program currently has “more than 300 registered participants from 42 states plus Washington, D.C. and Puerto Rico, along with nine countries outside the United States.”

If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.

Marcus Tullius Cicero

 

 

 

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