Category Archives: Saint Anthony Village

Call for Models for N.E. Thrift Shop Fashion Show

Face it – You belong on the runway, strutting your stuff, selling the latest fashion to an eager public.  Your chance is at hand.  Thrift Store (formerly Silver Angel) is planning a fashion show for June 15 and they’re looking for models of every age, stature, experience to show off their hot merchandise.  Manager of the store is Lynn Albright.  You’re find more on the web.

Thrift Store is at 1928 Central Avenue Northeast.  612 789 0600  Hours are Mon-Fri 10-6 and Saturday 10-5.

Watch for Thrift Store at the new Village Farmer’s Market at St. Mary’s Cathedral where they will have a presence on hand during Market hours Wednesdays 3:00-7:00.

Village Farmer’s Market Opens – and Expands in Northeast

Farmer’s Markets are popping up all over Northeast Minneapolis!  During the months to come we will be visiting and reporting on the wide variety of options available to Northeast customers.  For Windom Park residents the news is that Village Farmer’s Market is not waiting this year for Lindners to move on.  The season starts on Monday, June 6, with Sidewalk Days – vendors open on the sidewalk outside shops in St. Anthony Village Shopping Center.  June 6-27 the Sidewalk market will be open Mondays, 3:00-7:00 p.m.  The traditional market on the SAV parking lot opens July 11 – no Market on the 4th.

Meanwhile, the Village Farmer’s Market has opened another site at St. Mary’s Cathedral parking lot, 1701 6th Street Northeast.  A visit to the new site last week offered promise of a great site, a mix of vendors, and a welcoming atmosphere.  The St. Mary’s Cathedral is open Wednesday afternoons throughout the summer.

Updates at http://www.thevillagefarmersmarket.org.

Village Farmer’s Market 2/20/11 – CANCELLED

Due to the unending Winter of 2011 the Village Farmer’s Market scheduled for Sunday, February 20, has been postponed because of the anticipated blizzard.  It is tentatively re-scheduled for next weekend, weather permitting.

Music, Herbs and a Touch of Spring at the St. Anthony Winter Market

Winter marketing is about the only thing “hot” in Minnesota this year – and the Village Farmer’s Market winter venue turns up the heat this Sunday, February 20, with an afternoon of good listening to spice up the culinary treats.

The big draw is the food, of course.  There are fresh potted herbs (chives, basil, sage, rosemary, oregano, marjoram, mint) and possibly some container-size heirloom tomatoes and peppers.

Once again Lily’s will be serving their famous French crepes.

The first musical set, 11:00-1:00,  features the old time songs and tunes of Bob and Lynn Dixon.  From 1:00 – 3:00 it’s Greenwood Tree with Bill Cagley on guitar, mandolin and Irish drum, and Stu Janis on the hammered dulcimer and bowed psaltery

The Winter Market is at the St. Anthony Community Center, 3301 Silver Lake Road in St. Anthony.  The Market will be open on the third Sunday of March, April and May, 11:00 AM-3:00 PM.

Ladies’ Night in St. Anthony Village

Folks in Northeast Minneapolis and its neighbor suburbs seldom refer to St. Anthony Village.  It’s “The Village.”   After all, the venerable shopping hub was the first of its kind when it opened in the early 1950’s.  Today the smaller-than-average shopping center is home to a unique mix of friendly purveyors of goods and services.

Local merchants opening their doors and sweetening the shopping pot by inviting “The Ladies” join them for Ladies Night Out@St.Anthony Shopping Center.  The next Night Out is set for Friday, February 18, with future Friday specials on March 18, April 15 and May 20, 2011.

The evening (7:00-9:00 broadly interpreted) promises bargains and more including

A roster of speakers at Hidden Treasures, a high quality thrift shop local gathering spot for bargain hunters.  This week’s talk is about re-upholstering future, of which Hidden Treasures has loads of treasures awaiting rehab.

Each month at Annona Gourmet proprietress Jean Rarick will feature a different vendor or artist, starting at 6:00 p.m. so she won’t conflict with her next door neighbors at Hidden Treasures. This week Jean will feature Discovered Design, hand crafted and beaded kitchen utensils, wine glasses and more.  Linda from Leeski Farms and the Unreliable Bakery will introduce shoppers to rubs, dipping spices and other culinary treats.  Most important, Jean will be on hand to introduce and answer every imaginable question about her extensive inventory of oils, vinegars, pasta and much more.

Shopping can take its toll on a hapless “lady” – There are coupons and bargains on Village eateries including fast food stops such as DQ and Subway, a sparkling new Broadway Pizza outlet, half-price appetizers at the Village Pub, an exhaustive inventory of teas at The Tea Source and many more.

The temps are up, the ice is melting, the days are getting longer. Ladies, it’s time for a Night Out in The Village!

 

St Anthony of Padua High School – Northeast Minneapolis

A black and white picture of a class from St Anthony High School.(This article originally appeared in The Northeaster)

“Strong and strident women” is the memory that Carolyn Puccio has of her years at St. Anthony High School  Now a leader in the Sisters of St. Joseph Carondelet community, she is a proud graduate of St. Anthony which decades until it was closed in 1971.  At that time nearby DeLaSalle, operated by the Christian Brothers,  became a co-ed high school.

Unlike most of the Catholic high schools in the area St. Anthony High School was operated by the parish itself.  The original building still stands at 8th Street and 2nd Avenue Northeast where it houses one of the Catholic Eldercare sites. St Anthony High School was actually co-educational until DeLaSalle opened in 1900.

St. Anthony’s High School grew out of the parish of St. Anthony of Padua which was established in 1849.  In 1853 the Sisters of St. Joseph opened the school, which was known for a time as St. Mary’s Convent. The name change came when the school was merged with the parish school across the street some years later.  The new facility  which provided a home for the first church, the convent that housed the first parochial teachers in Minneapolis, continued to be known as St. Mary’s for many years. Though tuition was just fifty cents a month several of the young scholars were admitted free.  Receipts for 1854 were $197.58, with expenses at $203.70, leaving a deficit to begin the school year in 1855.  In his book Lighting New Fires, published by the National Catholic Educational Association, historian Michael Guera notes that “this item of information is of interest only to show how poorly and simply our predecessors lived, their wants were few and even those were supplied with difficulty; their spirit of self-sacrifice was great and their contentment in making sacrifices was still greater.

The first school had just five school rooms and a residence for the Sisters on the second floor. Sister Gregory LeMay, one of the original teachers, was the first Sister to receive the habit of the Sisters of St. Joseph in St. Paul. For most of its history St. Anthony was staffed almost entirely by the Sisters of St. Joseph.

St. Anthony, unlike most other high schools of the Sisters of St. Joseph, remained a parish-owned school.  Although the three year diploma offered at the high school for many years did not qualify students for college entrance, many students were admitted by taking entrance exams. At that time it was uncommon for young people to go to college, but most of the St. Anthony graduates did. In 1915 the building for St. Anthony’s High School was opened.  For decades it educated the young Catholic women of Northeast.

Graduates of St. Anthony of Padua High School have happy and amusing stories of their experience.  They agree that attendance at the school was “always a special advantage to families in the area.”  Graduates of St. Anthony of Padua elementary school were assured of admission to the high school.  They tell stories of threadbare blue jumpers  and blue oxfords commonly known as Happy Hikers, of playing basketball – and “usually losing” – against other Catholic girls’ schools in the Twin Cities, of dramatic productions in which boys from DeLaSalle were recruited to play the male roles.  1954 graduate Rose Vennewitz, now living in Fridley, remembers the experience of being checked out by the Sisters before going to the Prom.

One common memory is of the May processions to the Shrine of Our Lady of Perpetual Help, constructed in 1947 and still a on the grounds of St. Anthony of Padua church.

Though the school is closed the spirit remains as countless graduates of St. Anthony continue to lead the Northeast community.

The Flavors of Annona Gourmet in Saint Anthony Village

According to the infallible Wikipedia  Annona is a genus of flowering plants in the pawpaw sugar apple sugar apple family cultivated in Mexico since 1000 BC. Currently, seven Annona species and one hybrid are grown for domestic or commercial use mostly for the edible and nutritious fruits; several others also produce edible fruits. Many of the species are used in traditional medicines for the treatment of a variety of diseases. Several annonacaeous species have been found to contain annona.   Annona is also a goddess, personification of plenty or the produce of the yearly harvest.

Picture of the Annona plant

Botany and mythology aside, for increasing numbers of Twin Citians Annona is becoming a household word, not because of the flowering plant but because of Annona Gourmet.  Annona is a gastronomic treasure trove of taste-satisfying treats for the gourmet and for lurkers who want to know about subtle tastes.

James Norton, writing for the gourmet’s delight, Heavy Table, tempts the tastebuds with his description of Annona Gourmet:  “In terms of sheer impact, few gastronomic experiences rival letting a few drops of flavored balsamic vinegar slide across your palate.  The result can be a fig-tinted sledgehammer, a pomegranate wrecking ball, a blueberry uppercut;  vivid , slashing, barn-burning flavor that demands bread, or tonic, or vegetables to act as a catcher’s mitt for the vinegar’s flavor fastball.”  (Heavy Table, February 13, 2009)

In just two years Annona owner and Windom Park  resident Jean Rarick has made her welcoming shop an essential destination for many and a the hub of the community.  Visitors will find gourmet delicacies accented with neighborhood news and a glimpse of what’s next in Northeast Minneapolis, St. Anthony Village and environs.
Several years ago, while pondering a career change from the international business world of fine paper, Jean was laid off.  Having traveled extensively with her previous job, she had seen the gourmet shop concept in other countries and states.  Knowing there was nothing just  like she craved in Minnesota, she decided to open Annona Gourmet in The Village, a relatively nondescript strip mall that straddles St. Anthony Village and Northeast Minneapolis.

Annona Gourmet fills the gustatory gap while the community benefits by Jean’s commitment to stay in Northeast where she has lived for the past 25 years and where she has had family in the area since the late 1800’s.  Annona Gourmet also provides a lively outlet for local entrepreneurs with ideas, kitchens and workshops and a pitch to local customers.

Annona Gourmet offers an endlessly tempting array of gourmet delicacies – a rich assortment of vinegars that Jean rotates on a regular basis, extra virgin olive oils from around the world, pasta, sea salt and a mix of locally produced products.  Shoppers will find such local products as honey, jams, salsas and snacks plus a variety of art, pottery, jewelry and crafts, including handsome woodcrafts – and of course aprons — created by local artists and crafters.  Recent additions to the gourmet shelves include  coffee from Café Palmira, biscotti from LindaLiscious and seasonings from Kayak Kitchens.

Visitors to Annona Gourmet, 2807 Pentagon Drive in the Village Shopping Center, will also find a warm welcome, taste tests of fine vinegars and virgin oils, and a new appreciation of gustatory subtleties introduced by Jean who loves fine cuisine, her adventuresome customers, her community and good music as played on her favorite KFAI – not necessarily in that order.  Shoppers and shopper wannabes will  also find a busy shopkeeper and community resource, currently making big plans for the St Anthony Village holiday special set for December 10 – more on the traditional SAV carriage rides, vendors and entertainment in future posts.

Contact Jean and Annona at 612 354 2027 or sales@annonagourmet.com