Category Archives: minnesota women

Lessons for today from the Woman Suffrage Movement

The farther backward you can look, the farther forward you are likely to see.  Winston Churchill

Recently I posted on this blog a spate of brief and preliminary backgrounders about the forthcoming celebration of the centenary of ratification of the 19th Amendment that gave women the right to vote.  Celebration of the ratification is simply a point in time; what’s important is that we capitalize on the occasion to learn from and share the lessons that can be gleaned from the long and volatile struggle known as the Woman Suffrage Movement.

The hallmarks of the Woman Suffrage Movement were vision, commitment, resilience, collaboration and persistence – virtues demanded by these troubled times.  Fortunately, the tools to understand and share those stories are both rich and relevant. These are the links to these recent posts:

The earlier posts identify resources that cover the Woman Suffrage Movement from a national perspective. They suggest the broad perspective, what was happening at the national level, the leaders and key supporters of the Suffragettes.

Still it is often more meaningful to tackle complex issues such as ratification of the 19th Amendment from a local perspective, the context of  one’s personal experience.  The Woman Suffrage Movement may be best understood as the struggle evolved and involved individuals “close to home” – with whom we have some connection in terms of  geography or experience

Fortunately, the record of Minnesotans’ involvement in the Woman Suffrage Movement is robust and readily accessible.

For a quick and easy guide to Minnesota’s ratification, start with the Minnesota House Record posted here:   (http://history.house.gov/HouseRecord/Detail/15032436205)  The archives  include a replica of the original ratification document – an inspiring first step on the journey to trace the roots of the movement. (http://history.house.gov/HouseRecord/Detail/15032436205)

For an excellent overview of the history of Minnesota’s steps to ratification there is no better than Eric W. Weber’s excellent piece on the Minnesota Woman Suffrage Association  posted in MNOpedia.  (http://www.mnopedia.org/group/minnesota-woman-suffrage-association).  Weber’s essay  was reprinted by MinnPost in 2012 (https://www.minnpost.com/mnopedia/2012/09/minnesota-woman-suffrage-association-fought-womens-right-vote)

The MNOpedia entry leads to treasure troves of excellent resources including these:

These sources provide a firm foundation to appreciate the work of historian Jane Curry who has toured the state with her delightful one-woman show “Samantha Rastles the Woman Question.” It’s a powerful production that tells the story of the Woman’s Movement in a most delightful way!  Learn more here: (http://www.usfamily.net/web/dllund/jac/samantha.htm)

Though these posts may seem premature, consider the prolonged struggle for the Woman Suffrage Movement.  The parallel with today’s challenges offers a powerful model of resistance, collaboration, persistence and resilience, qualities that serve us well both individually and collectively in these difficult times.

She stood in the storm, and when the wind did not blow her way, she adjusted her sails ― Elizabeth Edwards

Learning and Sharing Stories of the Suffrage Movement

The reason for evil in the world is that people are not able to tell their stories.  ~ Carl Jung

The story of the Suffragette Movement is the story of resistance, persistence – and ultimate triumph.  The long struggle to ratify the 19th Amendment that guaranteed women’s right to vote is a uniquely American story worthy of retelling in these times.

The June 2019 centenary of passage of the 19th Amendment offers an opportunity for us to study the story of the Suffragettes in depth, to analyze and emulate the vision and tactics of the Movement.  This is a powerful story of American patriots who shared a vision and marshalled their talents, strength and unstinting hope to pursue a common purpose.

The centenary of their success, June 4, 2019, invites the nation to research the records, remember and retell the story.  There is time to honor the unstinting courage of the Suffragettes by doing a deep dive into the history of the Woman Suffraqe Movement — then sharing the stories with contemporaries and future generations.

Though it may seem like overkill, when tackling an historic issue of national scope a good place to start is with our nation’s repositories of recorded history –the Library of Congress and the National Archives and Records Administration.  Not the magnificent buildings in Washington, DC but the very accessible digital libraries that open the historic record to armchair searchers wherever they may be.   In recent times LC and the Archives have created digital repositories that breathe life into the story of the Suffragettes Movement.

Librarians and archivists responsible for preserving the record of the nation have taken a lead to harness digital technology to share the intellectual treasures of the nation.  They are committed to crafting useful tools that guide the remote searcher along the digital path to learning about the country’s legacy.  Their mission is to share the personal stories of real people whose recorded legacy is now accessible through digitized letters, scrapbooks, songs, photos, and diaries –  real life stories that share the thoughts and situations of those individuals and institutions that shaped this nation..

A couple of  starting points will guide the seeker’s path to the Suffragettes’ stories:

Library of Congress:

Though the physical Library of Congress is elegant it is beyond overwhelming; and yet a digital dive into the treasures is manageable. LC resources are even organized by grade/age level to suggest their appropriate audience, even  the youngest learner.  Some basic tips:

  • A good strategy is a dip into the primary documents digitized by LC – – it will inspire even the recalcitrant searcher to press on! Among the treasures are the files of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B Anthony as well as countless photos, letters, diaries that capture the stories, the images and voices of the suffragettes.   All that little stuff gives life to real people who worked for years to resist the human forces that impeded their struggle to reach a mighty goal. https://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/ourdocs/19thamendment.html
  • And here’s a great photographic complement to the primary documents collection. https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/list/076_vfw.html
  • For a timeline of American women’s road to assuring their voting rights, click here: https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/list/076_vfw_timeline.html

Each of these launch points will lead the searcher to treasure troves of stories waiting to be told.

National Archives:

The resources of the National Archives and the Library of Congress complement each other.   Staffers at the Archives  join  colleagues at LC in their commitment to expand digital access.  Of the many navigational tools here are some useful starting points:

These digital options for understanding the long struggle for passage of the 19th Amendment provide a logical first step on the research path; they offer a door to a world of stories!   The challenge is to realize and document this pivotal era in our nation’s history.  If we are to honor the labor and vision of the Suffragettes we must take to heart the priority for us to learn and tell the stories of the women and men who pressed on for decades to achieve what we now take for granted.  For us, the mission must be to study the true facts that capture the essence and describe the forces that emboldened the Suffragettes to speak truth to power for decades leading up to passage of the 19th Amendment.    The quest to learn, then tell, the stories deserves time, discussion, reflection.

Some other starting points:

For a really quick overview of the Suffragettes’ struggle, click here:

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/congress-passes-the-19th-amendment

For a broader view of American women’s rights, including but not limited to the Suffragette Movement, this Congressional publication provides a good overview.  http://history.house.gov/Exhibitions-and-Publications/WIC/Historical-Essays/No-Lady/Womens-Rights/

For authoritative information regularly updated, these are major – and very helpful –  sources:

These are simply suggestions; resources and perspectives abound.  Exploring, then telling, the story of the Woman’s Movement offers a focus and a challenge to examine strategies that emboldened the Suffragettes to resist and persist.  We are not the first Americans to face a mighty challenge.  We have much to learn from those who set the pace a century ago:

When you walk with purpose you collide with destiny. Bertice Berry

 

 

Escaping Anxiety This Summer of Our Discontent

By reading narrative, we escape the anxiety that attacks us when we try to say something about the world.  Umberto Eco


In this summer of our discontent we have a sense that control has been wrested from our hands.  One way to be sure that we are not reduced by the situation in which we find ourselves is to explore our options – especially ideas and events that expand our thinking beyond the harsh reality of the day.  Here are just of few of the creative mind-refreshing events happening this summer – the tip of a mighty learning iceberg (which, unlike physical icebergs, is not melting as a result of human stupidity.) Clearly the major institutions have promoted grand events, exhibits, openings and more.  Following are just a just a very few of the initiatives with a bookish connection that may be slipping through the promotional cracks.  There’s no intent to be inclusive, simply to suggest that readers be on the lookout for escape routes from anxiety!

The 2017 Book Art Biennial.  “Shout Out: Community Intervention, Independent Publishing, and Alternative Distribution” is the theme of this biennial event.  Expect programming that “encourages people of all disciplines and skill levels to amplify individual and collective voice through grassroots artistic practice.” The centerpiece of the Book Art Biennial is the presentation of the MCBA Prize, a unique award that showcases and honors the best artists’ books in the world. The winner will be announced at a gala and awards ceremony the evening of Saturday, July 22. (http://www.mnbookarts.org/biennial)

Registration is open through June 11 for exhibitors at the Thirteenth Annual Twin Cities Zine Fest set for September 24 2017.   The Free For All Zine Lounge is now open through August 13 at Boneshaker Books, 2002 23rd Avenue South.  Sponsored by the Twin Cities Zine Fest (http://tczinefest.org)

A Good Time for the Truth: Race in Minnesota. June 12 (7:00 PM – 8:30 PM) Minneapolis Central Library. IBé, Bao Phi and Rodrigo Sanchez-Chavarria as they read their essays from the timely book, “A Good Time for the Truth.” This collection from 16 local writers features reflective essays on life as a person of color in Minnesota. Q&A will follow the reading hosted by the editor Sun Yung Shin. Registration is encouraged and can be done here. (https://www.facebook.com/events/1761221477450326/?acontext=%7B%22ref%22%3A%223%22%2C%22ref_newsfeed_story_type%22%3A%22regular%22%2C%22feed_story_type%22%3A%22117%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22null%22%7D)

The East Side Freedom Library continues its monthly collaboration with A Greener Read Bookstore.  On June 16th the theme is “Storytelling through Vinyl and Film” Gather at 5:00 at the Bookstore, 506 Kenny Road in St. Paul, for happy hour and listening to music.  Focus will be on South African “kwaito” music, a blend of traditional South African forms and hip hop. ESFL will also continue their Women from the Center Reading Series, featuring the work of Midwest writers from diverse communities who support one another as they “write their truths.   Writers on the fourth Thursdays of the summer months include these:   June 22: Norah Murphy (White Birth, Red Hawthorn: A Memoir), July 27: Marcie Rendon (Murder on the Red River), August 24: Carolyn Holbrook (Earth Angels).  In fact, ESFL sponsors a robust summer programs overflowing with ideas and energy. ESFL is at 1105 Greenbrier Street, St Paul 55106. Check the full schedule here: (http://eastsidefreedomlibrary.org)

On Wednesday, June 21, Minneapolis parks will open more than 50 new Little Free Libraries  a gift from the Minneapolis Foundation to local families in honor of Minnesota Public Radio’s 50th anniversary. MPR hosts, local authors, and other guest readers will celebrate by reading children’s books at story times in parks all over the city, from sunrise to sunset on summer’s longest day. Book It to the Parks!  (http://www.minneapolisfoundation.org/bookit/)

Silverwood Park, in the far Northeast corner of Hennepin County, is one of the mighty county’s lesser known havens for creative expression of every sort.  Focus is on the talents of local and emerging artists. Silverwood Onstage is the summer series of amphitheater programs that include Wednesday night concerts, movies and a mixed bag of performances. For details on the diverse selections click here:   (https://www.threeriversparks.org/page/silverwood-onstage)

If you’re not already in a book group, you might want to join one of the several sponsored by the Minnesota Women’s Press.  To learn more, click here:  http://womenspress.com/main.asp?SectionID=10&SubSectionID=36&ArticleID=38&TM=62697.43

When’s the last time you reached out to immerse yourself in an unfamiliar bookstore?  Here are some possibilities that will welcome you with open tomes:   (https://www.newpages.com/independent-bookstores/minnesota-bookstores)

My favorite indie, Eat My Words, is moving up the road a piece this summer – still in Northeast Minneapolis.  More in a related blog post.   Meanwhile, the EMW calendar indicates more, not fewer, events.  Proprietor Scott VanKoughnett  confirms that event attendees will not be asked to tote armloads of books to the new site.  Click here for an interview with EMW Scott  VanKoughnett::  (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tumRr08qkrc)

Traveling this summer?  The American Writers Museum, the gift of retired executive Malcolm O’Hagan and other donors, opened May 16 in Chicago.  (http://americanwritersmuseum.org)

Closer to home, you might want to check out the SoMN, a network of southern Minnesota history museums.  (http://www.exploreminnesota.com/travel-ideas/5-must-see-museums-in-southern-minnesota/)

For the motherlode of ideas for summer escapes explore with the editors of Explore Minnesota their “bucket list” of possibilities!       (http://www.exploreminnesota.com/travel-ideas/your-2017-minnesota-bucket-list/)

TC’s Women’s and Girls’ Choirs Celebrate by Singing!

And all meet in singing, which braids together the different knowings into a wide and subtle music, the music of living.― Alison Croggon, The Naming

While musical experts of the world focus on what choir members can do, I would like to focus on what choir members can be. –Russell M. Nelson 

Two decades ago sixteen women from around the Twin Cities gathered for a relaxed dinner.  By the end of dinner they had exchanged updates on their families, jobs and life.  By the end of dessert they had constructed the foundation of a women’s choir. The Twin Cities Women’s Choir, then comprised of  32 singers, sponsored its debut performance on May 31 1998 at Lyndale Congregational Church.

Since that somewhat impromptu beginning the TCWC has grown, now singing in close harmony with the Twin Cities Girls’ Choir.  Today the choir features 150 members and a unique sound;  TCWC has commissioned over 35 compositions and arrangements for women’s voices and now sponsors a composition contest for emerging female composers.

They have also recorded five CDs and established a small group ensemble known as ENCORE!  Their concert schedule includes three major concerts and countless performances at community events.

Currently, the women and girls of both choirs are rehearsing for three early May concerts.  Both concerts will be held at the Lake Calhoun Event Center, 3450  Irving Avenue South, Minneapolis.

On Thursday, May 4, the two choirs will join their voices for the “Divas Concert.”  Doors open at 6:30 pm for the 7:00 performance.  This is a general admission concert; tickets are reserved $20 in advance, $25 at the door.

The TCWC concerts on Friday, May 5 and Saturday, May 6, are “Divas & Dessert Gala Fundraiser” concerts,    They feature a cabaret environment; seating is reserved.  The concert theme is Prospective, an exploration of the choir’s vision for the next two decades. The evening will include silent auctions, desserts and ENCORE!

Tickets are $35 advance, $40 at the door. Doors open at 6:30 for the silent auction, 7:00 for the concert.  The concert begins a 7:30.  Saturday’s  performance will be ASL interpreted.

Contact information:

Twin Cities Women’s Choir  http://www.twincitieswomenschoir.org
4631 Harriet Ave, Minneapolis, MN 55419   612 333 8292 sing@twincitieswomenschoir.org

Twin Cities Girls’ Choir  http://www.twincitiesgirlschoir.org4631 4631 Harriet Ave, Minneapolis, MN 55419     612-333-8292.


Equal Pay Day – In case you thought we’d solved that problem

A reminder before you get decked out for work that Tuesday, April 4 is Equal Pay Day 2017.  This is the symbolic day when women’s earnings catch up with men’s earnings from the previous year.  Some would have the public believe that the wage gap has been closed – these are the people who look at high paid female corporate executives, not at clerical workers or even long-term professional women whose lifetime incomes are affected by a host of obstacles to equal pay.

The early day reminder is that many women will decide to wear red on Equal Pay Day to emphasize how long it takes women to catch up.

It’s also worth remembering that it’s been over a half century since the Equal Pay Act became law.  After 54 years’ women now make an average of 82 cents for every dollar a man earns; at this rate, it could take at least 70 more years before the gap closes.

It’s generally assumed that the pay differential results from women’s choices, particularly to interrupt their careers by taking time to rear their families.  Still, Olivia Mitchell, director of the pension research council at the Wharton School, avers that this does not recognize other significant contributors including women’s lack of negotiating skills and the bias women face from employers – in other words, the “penalty” of childbirth and rearing are a biased excuse for a discriminatory situation.  I agree with Dr. Mitchell’s analysis – and would add a host of other reasonable explanations of what is a thorough explainable – and inexcusable – disputation.

A small sampling of resources for more on Equal Pay Day:

http://www.refinery29.com/2017/04/147705/what-is-equal-pay-day-gender-wage-gap-facts?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email_share

https://www.pay-equity.org/day.html

http://fortune.com/2017/04/03/equal-pay-day-2017-wage-gap/

Definitely check the excellent resource guide prepared by the American Association of University Women – a more systemic approach to a systemic problem.  http://www.aauw.org/resource/how-to-equal-pay-day/

For the lark of it, see how far you get with Cheryl Sandberg’s 20% counts campaign.  https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/news/2017/04/03/lean-in-sheryl-sandberg-20-percent-counts-campaign-to-close-gender-pay-gap/99841634/

In any event, no matter where you fit into the world of work and pay for work, take time to think about the inequity of unequal pay and the impact of low for women not only on individuals but on families and on the long-term welfare of older women.

 

UPDATE: http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/trump-pulls-back-obama-era-protections-for-women-workers/ar-BBzink0?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=UE01DHP

UPDATE: http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2017/04/trump-just-revoked-protections-women-workplace

 

 

International Women’s Day 2017 – Local and global initiatives

As we know, this Wednesday, March 8th,  the world celebrates International Women’s Day. (https://www.internationalwomensday.com/Resources)  There are tons of links online that promote the cause and this year’s theme:  #Be Bold for Change. (https://www.internationalwomensday.com/Resources) )

Though it’s dangerous to cite just one of the dozens of area events, perhaps the most inclusive on the list is the IWD Community Meal sponsored by the Women’s Consortium, Wednesday, March 8, 6:00-8:00 PM at Tubman Center East,1725 Monastery Way in Maplewood.  The idea is to bring a dish to share and a commitment  to work for a more inclusive, gender-equal world.  (RSVP@the Eventbrite link on MWC’s Facebook @MNwomen or contact MRC at 651 228 0338 or info@mnwomen.org.)  Do check the Resources link for the robust agenda of related events; there are scores.

On the national scene sub-theme  is “A Day Without a Woman”, a women’s strike that will take many forms.  Planners of that national initiative say that “anyone, anywhere, can join by making March 8th A Day Without a Women in or all of the following ways:”  1)  Women take the day off, from paid and unpaid work; 2) Avoid shopping for one day (with exceptions for small women-and minority-owned businesses); and/or 3) Wear RED in solidarity with A Day Without Women.  The sponsors add that “We ask that our male allies lean into care-giving on March 8th, and use the day to call on decision-makers at the workplace and in the government to extend equal pay and adequate paid family leave for women. More at #March8Strike and #DayWithoutAWoman.

And yet the initiative that struck me most profoundly is the Emirates Airline Festival of Literature, an event planned under the rubric of IWD.  The event spotlights both women and men who have made changes in their countries, whose experiences reflect their efforts to  empower women to achieve gender equality and to bring about positive change.  More about the Emirates Event here: http://www.emirateslitfest.com/  Having had the honor of working at Zayed University in Abu Dhabi several years ago I became acquainted with countless young Emirati women – I saw their potential and their challenges.  I  rejoice now that they will be part of the IWD celebration.  

 

Women’s March — Is that all there is?

Remember this? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LCRZZC-DH7M

The pussyhat has been decommissioned and passed on to someone who needs a hat-cum-history, the dust has settled and the world has not shifted on its axis. Is that all there is?

Not so, say tens of thousands of women, families, marchers and observers who experienced last weekend’s Women’s March – which has now become more like the March that raised awareness of the obvious.

For those interested in catching up and keeping up, there are boundless opportunities.

Some articles that suggest response and follow-up:

http://nymag.com/thecut/2017/01/next-steps-after-the-womens-march.html

This is but a sampling of what’s happening  – the Women’s March is not history history, only  the beginning.  It is definitely not “all there is.”

Extra, Extra – Read all about it!!!

 

UPDATE — Save those placards!

http://theartnewspaper.com/news/news/signs-of-the-times-museums-preserve-the-placards-from-the-women-s-marches-/

IMPORTANT UPDATE

Gloria Everson
January 27 at 6:27pm
Hello-

Since this is an event page and our event is over, there are some things Facebook won’t allow us to do here. We need to transition, but it will not happen overnight.

We still have so much work to do; therefore, here are a new business page and a new group page. You know how important posts could get lost as more and more posts were added to the feed? The business page helps us with that. This page will not change often but will allow the important stuff to be easily located.

The group page is more of a social page. The privacy settings are on ‘open’ now, so anyone can join. In about two weeks, we will change it to a ‘closed’ group, which simply means new people need to be approved and any current member of the page can do the approving.

It will be tough moving from our home, but it is for the best if we want to move forward. Please ‘like’ and ‘follow’ both of these pages.

New Business/Non-profit page
https://www.facebook.com/HearOurVoiceMN/

New Group page
https://www.facebook.com/groups/375965222773592/

Don’t miss this graphic depiction of the March!

http://hyperallergic.com/354457/the-womens-march-the-first-28-hours/?utm_source=sumome&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=sumome_share

 

 NEW: Comic take on the Women’s March:  http://hyperallergic.com/354071/a-comics-newspaper-for-the-womens-resistance/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Fights%20to%20Withhold%20Paintings%20from%20Capitol%20Hill%20Show%20Their%20Political%20Power%20Daily&utm_content=Fights%20to%20Withhold%20Paintings%20from%20Capitol%20Hill%20Show%20Their%20Political%20Power%20Daily+CID_7b37e2121a87596416f702b8dd5da3bc&utm_source=HyperallergicNewsletter&utm_term=A%20Comics%20Newspaper%20for%20the%20Womens%20Resistance