Category Archives: minnesota women

TC’s Women’s and Girls’ Choirs Celebrate by Singing!

And all meet in singing, which braids together the different knowings into a wide and subtle music, the music of living.― Alison Croggon, The Naming

While musical experts of the world focus on what choir members can do, I would like to focus on what choir members can be. –Russell M. Nelson 

Two decades ago sixteen women from around the Twin Cities gathered for a relaxed dinner.  By the end of dinner they had exchanged updates on their families, jobs and life.  By the end of dessert they had constructed the foundation of a women’s choir. The Twin Cities Women’s Choir, then comprised of  32 singers, sponsored its debut performance on May 31 1998 at Lyndale Congregational Church.

Since that somewhat impromptu beginning the TCWC has grown, now singing in close harmony with the Twin Cities Girls’ Choir.  Today the choir features 150 members and a unique sound;  TCWC has commissioned over 35 compositions and arrangements for women’s voices and now sponsors a composition contest for emerging female composers.

They have also recorded five CDs and established a small group ensemble known as ENCORE!  Their concert schedule includes three major concerts and countless performances at community events.

Currently, the women and girls of both choirs are rehearsing for three early May concerts.  Both concerts will be held at the Lake Calhoun Event Center, 3450  Irving Avenue South, Minneapolis.

On Thursday, May 4, the two choirs will join their voices for the “Divas Concert.”  Doors open at 6:30 pm for the 7:00 performance.  This is a general admission concert; tickets are reserved $20 in advance, $25 at the door.

The TCWC concerts on Friday, May 5 and Saturday, May 6, are “Divas & Dessert Gala Fundraiser” concerts,    They feature a cabaret environment; seating is reserved.  The concert theme is Prospective, an exploration of the choir’s vision for the next two decades. The evening will include silent auctions, desserts and ENCORE!

Tickets are $35 advance, $40 at the door. Doors open at 6:30 for the silent auction, 7:00 for the concert.  The concert begins a 7:30.  Saturday’s  performance will be ASL interpreted.

Contact information:

Twin Cities Women’s Choir  http://www.twincitieswomenschoir.org
4631 Harriet Ave, Minneapolis, MN 55419   612 333 8292 sing@twincitieswomenschoir.org

Twin Cities Girls’ Choir  http://www.twincitiesgirlschoir.org4631 4631 Harriet Ave, Minneapolis, MN 55419     612-333-8292.


Equal Pay Day – In case you thought we’d solved that problem

A reminder before you get decked out for work that Tuesday, April 4 is Equal Pay Day 2017.  This is the symbolic day when women’s earnings catch up with men’s earnings from the previous year.  Some would have the public believe that the wage gap has been closed – these are the people who look at high paid female corporate executives, not at clerical workers or even long-term professional women whose lifetime incomes are affected by a host of obstacles to equal pay.

The early day reminder is that many women will decide to wear red on Equal Pay Day to emphasize how long it takes women to catch up.

It’s also worth remembering that it’s been over a half century since the Equal Pay Act became law.  After 54 years’ women now make an average of 82 cents for every dollar a man earns; at this rate, it could take at least 70 more years before the gap closes.

It’s generally assumed that the pay differential results from women’s choices, particularly to interrupt their careers by taking time to rear their families.  Still, Olivia Mitchell, director of the pension research council at the Wharton School, avers that this does not recognize other significant contributors including women’s lack of negotiating skills and the bias women face from employers – in other words, the “penalty” of childbirth and rearing are a biased excuse for a discriminatory situation.  I agree with Dr. Mitchell’s analysis – and would add a host of other reasonable explanations of what is a thorough explainable – and inexcusable – disputation.

A small sampling of resources for more on Equal Pay Day:

http://www.refinery29.com/2017/04/147705/what-is-equal-pay-day-gender-wage-gap-facts?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email_share

https://www.pay-equity.org/day.html

http://fortune.com/2017/04/03/equal-pay-day-2017-wage-gap/

Definitely check the excellent resource guide prepared by the American Association of University Women – a more systemic approach to a systemic problem.  http://www.aauw.org/resource/how-to-equal-pay-day/

For the lark of it, see how far you get with Cheryl Sandberg’s 20% counts campaign.  https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/news/2017/04/03/lean-in-sheryl-sandberg-20-percent-counts-campaign-to-close-gender-pay-gap/99841634/

In any event, no matter where you fit into the world of work and pay for work, take time to think about the inequity of unequal pay and the impact of low for women not only on individuals but on families and on the long-term welfare of older women.

 

UPDATE: http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/trump-pulls-back-obama-era-protections-for-women-workers/ar-BBzink0?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=UE01DHP

UPDATE: http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2017/04/trump-just-revoked-protections-women-workplace

 

 

International Women’s Day 2017 – Local and global initiatives

As we know, this Wednesday, March 8th,  the world celebrates International Women’s Day. (https://www.internationalwomensday.com/Resources)  There are tons of links online that promote the cause and this year’s theme:  #Be Bold for Change. (https://www.internationalwomensday.com/Resources) )

Though it’s dangerous to cite just one of the dozens of area events, perhaps the most inclusive on the list is the IWD Community Meal sponsored by the Women’s Consortium, Wednesday, March 8, 6:00-8:00 PM at Tubman Center East,1725 Monastery Way in Maplewood.  The idea is to bring a dish to share and a commitment  to work for a more inclusive, gender-equal world.  (RSVP@the Eventbrite link on MWC’s Facebook @MNwomen or contact MRC at 651 228 0338 or info@mnwomen.org.)  Do check the Resources link for the robust agenda of related events; there are scores.

On the national scene sub-theme  is “A Day Without a Woman”, a women’s strike that will take many forms.  Planners of that national initiative say that “anyone, anywhere, can join by making March 8th A Day Without a Women in or all of the following ways:”  1)  Women take the day off, from paid and unpaid work; 2) Avoid shopping for one day (with exceptions for small women-and minority-owned businesses); and/or 3) Wear RED in solidarity with A Day Without Women.  The sponsors add that “We ask that our male allies lean into care-giving on March 8th, and use the day to call on decision-makers at the workplace and in the government to extend equal pay and adequate paid family leave for women. More at #March8Strike and #DayWithoutAWoman.

And yet the initiative that struck me most profoundly is the Emirates Airline Festival of Literature, an event planned under the rubric of IWD.  The event spotlights both women and men who have made changes in their countries, whose experiences reflect their efforts to  empower women to achieve gender equality and to bring about positive change.  More about the Emirates Event here: http://www.emirateslitfest.com/  Having had the honor of working at Zayed University in Abu Dhabi several years ago I became acquainted with countless young Emirati women – I saw their potential and their challenges.  I  rejoice now that they will be part of the IWD celebration.  

 

Women’s March — Is that all there is?

Remember this? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LCRZZC-DH7M

The pussyhat has been decommissioned and passed on to someone who needs a hat-cum-history, the dust has settled and the world has not shifted on its axis. Is that all there is?

Not so, say tens of thousands of women, families, marchers and observers who experienced last weekend’s Women’s March – which has now become more like the March that raised awareness of the obvious.

For those interested in catching up and keeping up, there are boundless opportunities.

Some articles that suggest response and follow-up:

http://nymag.com/thecut/2017/01/next-steps-after-the-womens-march.html

This is but a sampling of what’s happening  – the Women’s March is not history history, only  the beginning.  It is definitely not “all there is.”

Extra, Extra – Read all about it!!!

 

UPDATE — Save those placards!

http://theartnewspaper.com/news/news/signs-of-the-times-museums-preserve-the-placards-from-the-women-s-marches-/

IMPORTANT UPDATE

Gloria Everson
January 27 at 6:27pm
Hello-

Since this is an event page and our event is over, there are some things Facebook won’t allow us to do here. We need to transition, but it will not happen overnight.

We still have so much work to do; therefore, here are a new business page and a new group page. You know how important posts could get lost as more and more posts were added to the feed? The business page helps us with that. This page will not change often but will allow the important stuff to be easily located.

The group page is more of a social page. The privacy settings are on ‘open’ now, so anyone can join. In about two weeks, we will change it to a ‘closed’ group, which simply means new people need to be approved and any current member of the page can do the approving.

It will be tough moving from our home, but it is for the best if we want to move forward. Please ‘like’ and ‘follow’ both of these pages.

New Business/Non-profit page
https://www.facebook.com/HearOurVoiceMN/

New Group page
https://www.facebook.com/groups/375965222773592/

Don’t miss this graphic depiction of the March!

http://hyperallergic.com/354457/the-womens-march-the-first-28-hours/?utm_source=sumome&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=sumome_share

 

 NEW: Comic take on the Women’s March:  http://hyperallergic.com/354071/a-comics-newspaper-for-the-womens-resistance/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Fights%20to%20Withhold%20Paintings%20from%20Capitol%20Hill%20Show%20Their%20Political%20Power%20Daily&utm_content=Fights%20to%20Withhold%20Paintings%20from%20Capitol%20Hill%20Show%20Their%20Political%20Power%20Daily+CID_7b37e2121a87596416f702b8dd5da3bc&utm_source=HyperallergicNewsletter&utm_term=A%20Comics%20Newspaper%20for%20the%20Womens%20Resistance

Women’s March on Washington – Minnesota Style

Though some of us may know a politico or campaign contributor who is headed to DC for the inauguration later this month, most of us know (and envy) a friend or family who will be visiting Our Nation’s Capitol the following day to join the Women’s March on Washington. (https://www.womensmarch.com) on Saturday, January 21, not coincidentally the day after the Inauguration. These are the Minnesota marchers who will be hopping on the bus – or more convenient transport — to venture 1100 miles, don a fuchsia pussy hat and join hundreds of colleagues at the Capitol, then march from the Capitol  down the Mall to share a determined message to the new regime.

What some Minnesotans may not yet know is that the Women’s March on Washington has spawned a nation of state and local “sister” marches throughout the nation. None will be more energetic, committed, informed — probably cold – than the Minnesota marchers. Here are the basics as found on the very lively FB site for the Minnesota march: (https://www.facebook.com/events/1798874673734173/)

Starting at 10am we will meet on the John Ireland Blvd Bridge in front of Minnesota History Center (near the corner of John Ireland Blvd and Kellogg Blvd). From 10-11am we plan to get pumped up, meet one another, form new friendships and likely hear from a motivational speaker (who is yet to be determined). Please plan to arrive no later than 10:30am. At 11am we will start our march heading northeast on John Ireland Blvd toward the Capitol. We plan to arrive at the Capitol around 11:30/12pm. From 12pm until 2pm we will have a rally including entertainment, speakers, etc. If you are unable to participate in the march itself but wish to participate in this event, please feel free to join us at the Capitol around noon. The rally will end at 2pm.

These days both the national and, even more, the Minnesota sites are bursting with updates, anecdotes, calls to action and more! Anyone with a device and a comfy chair can keep up with the latest, share ideas, express an opinion and support the marchers in Minnesota and in DC.

There will be a post event gathering at sites around the state, including at the East Side Freedom Library which is opening its doors, providing hot beverages and encouraging marchers, including virtual marchers, to share their experiences, opinions, commitments and hopes. (http://eastsidefreedomlibrary.org/event/womens-march-open-house/)

UPDATE: Emily’s List announcement:  http://www.msnbc.com/hardball/watch/emily-s-list-to-sponsor-women-s-march-on-washington-847831619542

UPDATE 1/6 – The Minnesota to Washington Women’s March has joined the blogosphere:     http://www.eramn.org/national-march-blog

Strong Women in the Life of Associate Justice McKeig

On Thursday, September 15, 2016, Anne K. McKeig took the oath of office as the newest member of the Minnesota Supreme Court.   As most Minnesotans know Associate Justice McKeig is the first American Indian member of the State’s highest court.

Along with many MPR listeners I learned more about McKeig when she was interviewed recently by host Tom Weber. (https://www.mprnews.org/story/2016/08/02/anne-mckeig) Inspired and intrigued by McKeig’s life story I have been thinking about the powerful women who, I must believe, have influenced her life. Since there exist countless McKeig interviews, features, photos, bios and factoids, I decided to focus here on a few women who almost certainly helped to shape her ideas and support her efforts, women who shared their strength with this promising young jurist.

These are not legal scholars, who obviously had a hand; they are instead strong women who served as role models along McTeig’s path to the Court. Though a realize there are countless others – these are the women who might be overlooked in the official narrative.

The first woman who comes to mind is Ruth Myers, known as the Mother of American Indian Education in Minnesota. A member of the Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Chippewa (Ojibwe) Ruth broke ground as the first American Indian to serve on the Duluth School Board. She was later appointed by Governor Perpich to serve on the Minnesota State Board of Education, a policy-making board later deep-sixed by the Legislature.   Ruth was my role model and friend – to record her story I submitted a short piece for MnOpedia. (http://www.mnopedia.org/person/myers-ruth-1926-2001) I feel certain that, though she died in 2001, Ruth Myers left a path for the young McKeig to follow.

And then there is Cecilia Wattles McKeig, Anne’s mother. A graduate of the College of St. Catherine, Cecilia went on to earn a Masters degree in History from the University of Minnesota. She settled in Federal Dam, Minnesota, (the town of 110_ residents now made famous by McKeig) where she served for thirty years as Director of Indian Education at Northland High school.

Cecelia McKeig is herself a published author; her history of the Bemidji area was published by the Beltrami County History Center in 2013. (Bemidji: A Snapshot of Bemidji 1940-1960: Arcadia Publishing, 2013) Last Spring Ceceilia McKeig was honored with the St. Catherine University Medal of Distinction, in recognition of her work as educator and historian.

Following in her mother’s education footsteps, Anne McKeig graduated from St. Catherine University, a liberal arts college for women founded in 1905 by the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet. The strength and wisdom of early – if undeclared – feminists lives on in the mission, the curriculum and, some would argue, the structures themselves.

It is no coincidence that McKeig’s recent swearing in ceremony took place at O’Shaughnessy Auditorium on the campus of St. Catherine University – or that the students from Northland High School performed a drum circle – or that the White Earth Color Guard posted colors — at that festive, and deeply meaningful, event.

Note: For a touching video of Justice McKeig, in which she expresses thanks for her mentors, including retired Justice Robert A. Blaeser and his wife click here: http://theuptake.org/2016/06/28/live-video-gov-dayton-appoints-a-supreme-court-justice/

 

 

Equal Means Equal – Time to get serious about the ERA!

Equality of rights under the law shall not be abridged

or denied on account of gender.

In recent weeks I’ve been hearing a lot of buzz around the theme Equal Means Equal.   Though the theme is of longer standing, I believe the local buzz was fanned by the t celebration of Women’s Equality Day on August 26. I must have been distracted by the start of the Great Minnesota Get-Together because, sad to say, I missed the occasion and the opportunity to learn more about this important movement. (http://www.nwhp.org/resources/commemorations/womens-equality-day)

Specifically, I missed the local screening and discussion  of Equal Means Equal sponsored by ERA Minnesota at the St. Anthony Main theater. I’ve been trying to catch up ever since. I’ve learned from attendees at the screening that ERA Minnesota not only showed the documentary, but lit the local ERA movement fire by hosting a panel that included powerful state and federal elected officials and leaders of the burgeoning Equal Means Equal movement.

No wonder there’s a buzz….

Just in case others, like me, are not up to speed on the full implication of Equal Means Equal here are some of the basics.

Equal Means Equal is a national campaign to tackle the challenge to (finally) pass the Equal Rights Amendment. The premise is that the need for a Constitutional Amendment must remain a priority.

The term Equal Means Equal is propelled and informed by leaders who have produced both a book and an award-winning documentary film that tell the compelling story:

Equal Means Equal: Why the Time for an Equal Rights Amendment Now is the book, written by Jessica Neuwirth, published in January 2015. The book “tells the story of the legal cases that inform the need for an ERA, along with contemporary cases in which women’s rights are compromised without the protection of an ERA.”  Topics covered in the book range from pay equity to violence against women to pregnancy discrimination and other stories that underscore needs that are not yet recognized or remedied..

The companion piece to the book is the documentary by the same name. Directed by Kamala Lopez the film has received numerous awards. The documentary, which features an all-star cast including Patricia Arquette, Gloria Steinem, Eleanor Smeal and others, presents real life stories and legal cases that depict the ways in which “outdated and discriminatory attitudes inform and influence seemingly disparate issues, from workplace harassment to domestic violence, rape and sexual assault to the foster care system, and the healthcare conglomerate to the judicial system.” Again, the thesis of the documentary is that present inadequate laws prove the compelling argument for passage of the ERA.

Needless to say, ERA Minnesota (http://www.eramn.org) can provide much more information on the book, the documentary and the Equal Means Equal campaign.

Though I’ve been slow to tune in to the buzz, I get it now and am eager to share the message!