Monthly Archives: December 2012

Judge Edward Foote Waite Remembered in Northeast Minneapolis

Children who play and swim in Waite Park, learn at Waite Park School, and live in the Waite Park neighborhood might be interested in know more about Judge Edward Foote Waite (whose name is honored throughout their quiet residential community.  They might wonder about the man whose name is everywhere – and why, when Judge Waite was a elderly man, children from Waite Park School would collect pennies to purchase flowers to take to him on his birthday.

The story of Edward Foote Waite is that of a distinguished Minneapolis leader whose involvement in public affairs covers most of the 20th Century.  Though he lived almost all of his long life in Minneapolis, his roots were distinctly New England.  An editorial in the Minneapolis Tribute described the Judge as “a Yankee intellectual in the great tradition of Emerson, Thoreau and Oliver Wendell Holmes…stern and uncompromising with willful evil…compassionate with the weak and suffering…a man devoted to his duty and to his community…the very best type of the old New England tradition.”   (Jay Edgerton, Minneapolis Tribune, 1-15-50).

Born in 1860 in Norwich, NY Waite migrated to Minnesota in 1888 as a traveling examiner for the pension office, processing applications for pensions from Civil war veterans.  As an examiner Waite gained a reputation for his keen eye in spotting fraudulent claims, a characteristic that did not sit well with the miscreants.

After a brief tenure in private practice Waite was named assistant Hennepin county attorney.  Based on his background as a tenacious fraud-spotter he was appointed to serve as Minneapolis Chief of Police.    The short -term assignment to clean up the department ignited in him a lifetime interest in and commitment to juvenile justice.

Waite was appointed to the city bench in 1904; in 1911 he began his lengthy career as a member of the district court, responsible for juvenile court which remained his first love throughout his judicial career. A proponent of what would be known today as “tough love” he was a strict enforcer of the law who was credited with having helped hundreds of young people.  He once dismissed his detractors by observing that “the better the home surroundings of the boy, the greater the prospects of his being dealt with in a way he and his friends may consider severe.”

The Judge earned a reputation as The Children”s Friend.  A story was told of a boy who had been before him who was quoted as saying “he’s been a bully good friend to me, and there’s a lotta guys would say the same thing. He ain’t one of those stiffies that sets up there and looks at a kid like he was a worm; he comes right where we live.”  (Minneapolis Tribune, 4-28-58)

Judge Waite served on the juvenile bench for twenty years (1911-1921 and 1931-1941)  For over a half century after his 1941 retirement from the bench Judge Waite remained an active community leader.  Working long hours in his office on the 23rd Floor of the Rand Tower Judge Waite explored a range of legal issues in his voluminous publications and speeches. He served as special assistant to the U.S. attorney general to hear the cases of conscientious objects.  Later he was appointed by Governor Luther Youngdahl to the state commission on reform of the state’s divorce laws.  In a significant study of children of divorce he wrote “the child in every divorce case has…ipso facto a status of disadvantage which challenges the judge, and opens to him the duty to reduce it so far as possible.”

Juvenile justice was not Judge Waite’s only interest.  In an important legal treatise  published in 1949 in the Minnesota Law Review Waite wrote eloquently of “Jefferson’s ‘Wall of Separation’, What and Where”. In that article he raises the hypothetical question:  “In what sense, if at all, is this ‘a Christian nation’?  Is there ‘a wall of separation between church and state’ and if so, where is it, and what really does it separate?”  He poses and ponders the paradox without overtly answering his own question.

Tbroughout Judge Waite’s long life one of his greatest concerns was the condition of minorities in Minneapolis.  Well into his 90’s he wrote an article for the Minnesota Law Review on racial segregation in the public schools.  He stressed that the “fundamental crying need is for people to put out of their minds prejudices growing out of such accidents as race, religion and creed.”

After Waite’s death the name of the Elliot Park House at 2215 Park Avenue was changed to the Edward Foote Waite House, a move the Judge had halted during his life, admitting to the Elliot Park Board that  “After I’m dead, of course, I’ll have no control over what you do.”  (Minneapolis Star 10-22-56)

Apparently Judge Waite did not protest, or his protests fell on deaf ears,  when, in 1949, the Park Board designated the land referred to as the “Cary-Cavell site as Waite Park.   Waite School opened in September 1950, a unique collaborative project between the Minneapolis School and Park Boards.

The years did not slow the activities of Judge Waite.  After the death of his wife in 1935 Waite lived alone until his last years when a niece came to help him.  For his entire adult life he lived at 2009 Queen Avenue in South Minneapolis., conveniently close to downtown for an energetic jurist who never owned a car.

At his 95th birthday party he mused that, if he had his life to live over again, he “should hope’” he would make some changes…. Apparently one thing he would do different was to keep up his membership in the American Bar Association – at age 96 re-upped his membership, becoming the oldest applicant in the history to the ABA

Judge Waite died in 1958 at age 98.  Judges from Minneapolis municipal and Hennepin county district courts were honorary pall-bearers at the memorial services held at Plymouth Congregational Church where the Judge was a lifetime member and leader.

Northeasters can be proud that , though Judge Edward Foote Waite did not live in Northeast, his name, his wisdom and his progressive ideas life on in the neighborhood that bears his name.

 

 

 

Reflection on Round Tables

At a round table there is no dispute about place.  (Italian proverb)

A friend once observed that friendly people have round dining room tables – so they can always make room for more —  guests, that is, not food.   Of course those with square or oblong tables are always willing to add leaves can also find linens and placements that fit the décor.

Still, it’s a round table that bespeaks hospitality – especially if it’s laden with holiday treats.

The holiday season is a good time to think about the symbolism of round and expandable tables.  It’s a visual image that suggests the warm welcome that a family or a home can extend to embrace others – families in need, a lonely neighbor, youth or elderly who find themselves alone at holiday time.

During the holiday season households often stockpile more than enough food to share.  There may even be an unopened gifts that meets the visitor’s need.  Spare folding chairs or other sitting surfaces are just waiting to join the festivities.  Or do it the old way with a kiddy card table or piano bench where young folks can get in a word, possibly free of the fine points of etiquette.

Round tables sometimes lack balance – but so do families, neighborhoods, congregations, holidays, even people’s lives.   Lack of balance adds a special scintilla of panache to dining room tables and to holiday feasts alike.

 

Just Checking — When a PHone Call Really Matters

Will anybody call me today?

This wisp of self-doubt came from an elderly woman in response to a query about what questions she might have about life, the universe and everything.  A parish nurse who had been to visit the homebound member of her congregation shared the poignant story.  The simple question has stayed with me as I have been on t he periphery of a program called Tele-Care sponsored by Neighbors, Inc. where I have been a volunteer in recent times.

Many of us are perpetually at the ready, knowing the phone will ring any minute.  With any luck it is a friend or family member wanting to share a bit of cheer.  Or then again, it may be a salesperson, a pollster, a wrong number or, for families with teenagers….. The point in, we get lots o f calls spoken or texted on our landline, cell phone, inevitably on a Dick Tracy-style wristwatch or an implanted device.  It’s hard to hear the lonely voice of this isolated woman hoping for – and needing – a friendly phone call.

Human service providers use the term “telephone reassurance program” to categorize organizations that have structured ways to facilitate what is, in fact, a simple exchange in which a volunteer makes a scheduled call to an individual who is unable to get out of his or her home.  The caller is a phone friend, just checking to be sure the homebound person has eaten properly, taken prescribed meds on time, has enough food in the house to withstand the next blizzard, remembers to keep the doctor appointment or the visit to the hairdresser – and to spread a bit of good cheer along the way.

Of course family members, friends and neighbors make “telephone reassurance” calls all the time – it’s just that some folks, such as the woman who spoke with the parish nurse, fall through the conversation cracks.  At the same time, one source of a regular check-in, the Meals on Wheels program, has been restructured; for many, the daily drop-in by the MOW driver is yet another loss.

Spotting an opportunity, a number of corporations are promoting pricey “telephone reassurance” products and services to vulnerable adults and their concerned families.  For generous volunteers, a lonely senior or disabled person is a neighbor who needs a helping hand.  For others, that same homebound person is a source of easy income – robo-calls are cheap.

Volunteer programs such as Neighbors’ Tele-Care are no cost to the recipient for whom a daily phone call is both a day brightener and a safety net.  Generous – and chatty – volunteers enjoy t he program as much as the individuals who get the call.  Some say they appreciate the structure that a scheduled call adds to their day.  In many cases, friendships blossom and bear fruit.

Neighbors’ Tele-Care is one of countless low-cost/high impact programs hosted by nonprofits and faith communities.  It happens to be the one with which I have experience.

My thought is to share the concept, not any specific program.  Connecting a lonely person with a program such as Tele-Care would make a thoughtful holiday gift – one that truly deserves the tagline “the gift that keeps on giving.”

Neighbors’ Tele-Care program is open to all who live in the seven-county metro area.  For more information, check the Neighbors website or call Tele-Care at 651 306-1408 or info@neighborsmn.org.

Making Room for a Children’s Classic

Note:  Snowbound days are meant for slow thinking about ordinary things.  Yesterday’s gentle snowfall on a quiet Sunday spurred me to learn and write about books that help introduce children to the realities of poverty and hunger in our midst.  The hours I have been spending as a volunteer at Neighbors do give me a fresh take on ordinary things.  This morning my concern is the plight of homeless people faced with a foot of new fallen snow.  A piece I had written for Neighbors came to mind.  Though the piece describes a program at Neighbors, the message is universal.  Furthermore, it’s about one of my favorite stories and this entire blog is simply  about poking around……

***

One of my favorite stories of the holiday season is  Always Room for One More, written by Sorche Nic Leodhas and illustrated by Nonny Hogrogian.  Based on a Scottish folktale it’s the story of a generous Scotsman, Lachie MacLachlan, who welcomes every weary traveler who passes by on a stormy night into his “wee house in the heather” where “there’s always room for one more.”

The host’s generosity is part of the story – the rest of the tale is the beautiful  thank you of his grateful guests.  It’s a warm and humorous story, complete with a musical score for singing along.  And it’s just right for the Christmas season.

When Lache extends his hand, his reward is rich.  A tinker, a tailor, a sailor, a ‘lassie’, an ‘auld’ wife, a bagpiper and others join him.  There’s dancing and singing till the house falls down!  With the help of his guests Lachie builds a bigger house, where there is ‘always room for one more.’”

The story sets a tone and is delightfully infectious.  Though shopping for toys, books, clothing, games and other holiday gifts for an adopted family is not quite the same as Lache’s experience, the spirit and the rewards are very much the same.

Many families and seniors in our community are like the weary travelers Lachie befriends.  Neighbors depends on our friends to make room in their hearts by adopting a family or senior.  As in Lachie’s stories, the rewards for all are great.

The promotion part:  This was part of a pitch for Neighbors Adopt-a-Family and Adopt-a-Senior holiday programs.  Neighbors is a “full service” social service agency – thrift shop, food shelf, tele-care, transportation, emergency assistance and much more.  It serves and is largely supported by residents of northern Dakota County — South St Paul, West St Paul, Inver Grove Heights, Mendota, Mendota Heights, Lilydale and Sunfish.  If you want to know about these programs or about Neighbors in general, you can let me know or contact Neighbors directly.– info@neighborsmn.org, www.neighborsmn.org,   651 455 1508 or visit Neighbors’ new site  at 222 Grand Avenue West in South St. Paul.

Note:  Snowbound days are meant for slow thinking about ordinary things.  Yesterday’s gentle snowfall on a quiet Sunday spurred me to learn and write about books that help introduce children to the realities of poverty and hunger in our midst.  The hours I have been spending as a volunteer at Neighbors do give me a fresh take on ordinary things.  This morning my concern is the plight of homeless people faced with a foot of new fallen snow.  A piece I had written for Neighbors came to mind.  Though the piece describes a program at Neighbors, the message is universal.  Furthermore, it’s about one of my favorite stories and this entire blog is simply  about poking around……

***

One of my favorite stories of the holiday season is  Always Room for One More, written by Sorche Nic Leodhas and illustrated by Nonny Hogrogian.  Based on a Scottish folktale it’s the story of a generous Scotsman, Lachie MacLachlan, who welcomes every weary traveler who passes by on a stormy night into his “wee house in the heather” where “there’s always room for one more.”

The host’s generosity is part of the story – the rest of the tale is the beautiful  thank you of his grateful guests.  It’s a warm and humorous story, complete with a musical score for singing along.  And it’s just right for the Christmas season.

When Lache extends his hand, his reward is rich.  A tinker, a tailor, a sailor, a ‘lassie’, an ‘auld’ wife, a bagpiper and others join him.  There’s dancing and singing till the house falls down!  With the help of his guests Lachie builds a bigger house, where there is ‘always room for one more.’”

The story sets a tone and is delightfully infectious.  Though shopping for toys, books, clothing, games and other holiday gifts for an adopted family is not quite the same as Lache’s experience, the spirit and the rewards are very much the same.

Many families and seniors in our community are like the weary travelers Lachie befriends.  Neighbors depends on our friends to make room in their hearts by adopting a family or senior.  As in Lachie’s stories, the rewards for all are great.

The promotion part:  This was part of a pitch for Neighbors Adopt-a-Family and Adopt-a-Senior holiday programs.  Neighbors is a “full service” social service agency – thrift shop, food shelf, tele-care, transportation, emergency assistance and much more.  It serves and is largely supported by residents of northern Dakota County — South St Paul, West St Paul, Inver Grove Heights, Mendota, Mendota Heights, Lilydale and Sunfish.  If you want to know about these programs or about Neighbors in general, you can let me know or contact Neighbors directly.– info@neighborsmn.org, www.neighborsmn.org,   651 455 1508 or visit Neighbors’ new site  at 222 Grand Avenue West in South St. Paul.

Children’s Books Portray the Tough Reality of Hunger and Poverty

For far too many children abject poverty and insatiable hunger are a constant reality.   Still, most children are shielded from the facts that some of their peers know only too well.  For children who live in comfort, good books that portray children with whom they can identify can open doors of understanding, even empathy.

Much that is written for children depicts the travesty of global hunger – starving children who struggle against unspeakable conditions in faraway lands.  Poignant  as these stories are, some are remote, beyond the experience or even the imagination of a child.

In recent times the world of children’s literature has expanded to embrace the plight of children closer to home.   My amateur search for children’s books about poverty and hunger is grossly limited by my ignorance of the genre.    A good children’s librarian, teacher or bookseller would be a far better resource.  My thought has been to explore children’s stories about hunger in our midst.  The goal has been to find books that tell a story that will some day have meaning for my grandson whose idea of severe hunger is missing a glass of milk at bedtime.

The unfortunate and statistically inaccurate fact is that ethnicity and family situation play a role in several children’s books that deal with poverty and hunger.   Adults sharing these books are cautioned to take this into account by stressing that the characters are not responsible for their condition.  For the most part the causes of poverty are not individual but systemic.

Many books that depict causes and conditions of poverty derive from passed from generation to generation; many come from places and people that enjoy an oral rather than written tradition.  Though the setting may be unfamiliar, the message transcends geography.  These books come to life when they are shared with caring adults who can interpret the underlying factors that shape the lives of individuals and families, especially children, who are not to blame for their situation.

ü  A good conversation starter is the classic story of Stone Soup, a familiar tale that has been told in words and pictures by countless writers and artists who know children well.

ü  Rosie, the Shopping Cart Lady, by Chia Martin, is a story for children, told by a child, a good introduction to the reality of poverty and homelessness for young book lovers.

ü  Another good read, based on a Chinese folktale, is One potato, two potato retold by Cynthia DeFelice.  In this story a hungry family learns that doubling their edibles is less important than expanding their circle of friends.

ü  In The Roses in my Garden, set in Afghanistan, author Rufshana Kahn tells the story of a young refugee living with terrifying memories.  Overcome by thirst, hunger and mud he continues to dream of freedom.

ü  Beatrice’s Goat by Page McBrier and Lori Lohstoefer, was first published by Heifer Project International.  The book describes how the gift of a goat brought a level of prosperity to a village in Uganda.

ü  In The Caged Birds of Phnom Penh Frederick Lipp describes how a young girl saves money to buy a bird for her impoverished extended family.

ü  Sounder, by William Armstrong and James Barkley, is the story of a 19th Century African American sharecropper family.

ü  In A Shelter in Our Car Monica Gunning writes about a widowed mother and her daughter Zettie who are forced to leave their home in Jamaica.  The mother’s strength instills hope and confidence is the little girl.

ü  Jane Resh Thomas tells the story of Latino migrant workers far from and lonesome for their homeland during the holiday season in Lights on the River.

ü  In Angel City an elderly African man discovers an abandoned baby on a Los Angeles street.  With no experience, he rears the child as his own, keeping the child and hope alive with songs and stories.

ü  A Handful of Seeds by Monica Hughes recounts the story of Concepcion, a young orphan girl who is forced to move to the barrio when her grandmother dies.  When she learns that her new friends must steal for food Concepcion decides to sow the corn and bean seeds left to her by her grandmother.  The community garden represents hope and illustrates the impact one person can have on a community.

ü  Gowanus Canal is a grubby area in NYC in which a homeless man and a brood of dogs share a common fate.  Jonathan Frost shares their story in his first book, Gowanus Dogs.

ü  Race and poverty play a role in Lucky Beans, based on the real life memories recounted by author Becky Birtha’s grandmother.  It’s the story of a Depression-era African American family who enter a bean-counting contest with high hopes of winning a sewing machine.

ü  The Double Life of Zoe Flynn by Janet Lee  Carey is the story of a little rich girl with a secret – – that her family is no longer rich but living in a van.  Hope and strong family ties help Zoe survive her situation.

ü  Uncle Willie and the Soup Kitchen is a realistic story in which a young boy sees first-hand the difficult lives of families who are hungry and the kindness they are shown at the workers at the soup kitchen.

ü  Well-known author Eve Bunting recounts the plight of a homeless boy trying to avoid detection in an airport terminal.  Fly Away Home describes how a bird in flight gives him hope.

ü  In Sam and the Lucky Money by Karen Chinn, Cornelius Van Wright and Ying-Hwa Hu, the young boy Sam discovers the true meaning of the “lucky money’ his grandparents have given him to buy “anything he wants.”

ü  Mama Panya’s Pancakes by Mary Chamberlin and Richard Chamberlin is about a poor Kenyan mother and son who go to market to shop for the ingredients to make pancakes.  The generous boy insists on inviting all people he encounters to join the pancake feast.

ü  Predictably the Berenstain Bears have a tale to tell, a story of conspicuous consumption writ large.  In The Berenstain Bears Count Their Blessings Mama helps her cubs realize that love trumps worldly goods, even Bearbie dolls.

ü  Last on the list, first in my heart, is one of my favorite holiday reads, Always Room for One More by Sorche Nic Leodhas, illustrated by Nonny Hogrogian.  Though it’s not strictly about hunger and poverty this book is the perfect holiday read for the whole family and the perfect gift for a young reader with a vivid imagination and a generous heart.

These few titles offer but a quick sample of the treasures on the shelves of libraries and bookstores.  In these volumes creative writers and illustrators interpret themes and conditions that are difficult for children to grasp, harsh realities that are nonetheless part of the world in which they live, learn, make friends and come to understand others.   A good story well told can reveal deep truths and subtle nuances that children are just learning to comprehend and apply.

A good book is always the ideal gift for any child.   In every home, for every child, there is always room for one more….

Teen Organizes Stylish Thank You to Neighbors, Inc.

Thrift shopping is hot with teens.   Thrift is a major motivator for young fashionistas who search out name label finds for fun and fashion.  Teens for whom recycling is a way of life assume that recycling wear-ables is an environmental  issue.  The essence of thrift shopping is that it is a grand adventure that comes with bragging rights for the shopper.

Kimberly Wilmes, a sophomore at South St. Paul High School, seized the opportunity to fulfill a “personal project” assignment and to thank a benefactor.  Her project:  Design-on-a-Dime, a style show featuring high end fashions plucked from the Clothes Closet at Neighbors, Inc.

Today Kim is a vibrant, beautiful, talented young woman – full of energy and ideas.  When she was placed with a foster family at eight weeks of age, she was a sick infant with special nutritional needs.  Her foster parents were able to obtain essential food form Neighbors food shelf.   In time Kim was adopted by the Wilmes family from whom she heard the stories of Neighbors’ assistance.   At Neighbors Clothes Closet she learned to spot fashion bargains.   As a teen with a task, she thought to say thank you to her benefactors.

Assignment in mind, Kim imagined the possibilities – she would go back to Neighbors, this time to the Clothes Closet.   At the end of the school day Kim would comb the racks at Neighbors Clothes Closet for designer label outfits.   With her mom as gentle adviser Kim considered and tried  racks of  fashion options.  She recruited classmates to advise, then model, the wardrobes.  With a keen eye and a good bit of conversation they decided on image-outfits – sassy tops with bold bottoms, accessories, shoes, hats.,bags – the total look.  Everything from casual to evening wear, even a bridal gown

On Friday evening, December 1, Kim, her coterie of models, including one extroverted male and some charming little girls for whom Kim babysits, strutted their coordinated stuff in the Design-on-a-Dime style show.  The show was fast-paced and professional.  The designer finds from Neighbors Clothes Closet were sensational – as were the prices which Kim itemized for the appreciative audience who responded with exuberant appreciation for the fashions – and the prices..

The show and community gathering were at Augustana Lutheran Church in West St. Paul.   Admission was a donation of non-perishable food or personal product to the Neighbors food shelf.  The food and the public poured in as the models prepped for their non-stop changes and their several promenades on the fashion runway.

Kim moderated the show with poise and aplomb that belied her youth.  Likewise the models who strutted their stuff with professional panache and pride.

Kim’s gratitude to Neighbors is an inspiration – – as is her passion to save money and the environment.  Kim embodies the spirit of creative volunteerism that has been the strength of Neighbors for forty years.  With young people like Kim Wilmes Neighbors will continue to serve the residents of northern Dakota County for decades to come.

You’ve Seen the Film – Now Read the Book!

Tired of mega-movie houses where the feature film is lost in the frenzy of projectiles, the grumbles of impatient toddlers, the crunch of spilled popcorn and pop containers under foot.  Ever wondered about the cognitive dissonance between the film and the well wrought work of fiction upon which it was ostensibly  based?

If so, you will want to peruse the exhibit of books-into-films now on exhibit at the Minneapolis Central Library.  Once again inveterate reader and library volunteer Ruthann Ovenshire has combed the shelves for adult fiction books that have been made into movies in recent times.

The list of titles is enormous.  All of the books are in the Central Library collection – and Ruthann regularly replenishes the exhibit when library patrons wisely latch on to a good read.

The holiday season summons the shopper, the home decorator, the baker, the social butterfly and other stressed readers to take a break.  Pick up  a good book – go see the movie later.  If you’ve already seen the movie, this would be a good time to find out just how good the original tome really was!

Following is the list of adult fiction books recently made into films. The date listed is the film date.  All of these titles are in the collection at Minneapolis Central Library, 300 Nicollet Mall, conveniently located along the Holidazzle Parade route!

Syrup / Maxx Barry. (2012)

Salvation Boulevard / Larry Beinhart (2011)

World War Z / Max Brooks (2013)

London Boulevard / Ken Bruen (2010)

A princess of Mars / Edgar Rice Burroughs (2012)

The Lincoln Lawyer / Michael Connelly (2011)

The Loop / Joe Coomer  (2010)

We can remember it for you wholesale / Philip K. Dick  (2012)

The Three Musketeers / Alexandre Dumas  (2011)

One for the Money / Janet Evanovich  (2011)

Paranoia / Joseph Finder  (2013)

Something borrowed / Emily Giffin  (2011)

Brighton Rock: An Entertainment / Graham Greene  (2010)

Abraham Lincoln : vampire hunter / Seth Grahame-Smith. (2012)

Water for Elephants / Sara Gruen  (2011)

The Descendents / Kani Hart Hemmings (2011)

Cogan’s trade / George V. Higgins.  (2012)

The woman in black : a ghost story / Susan Hill  (2012)

Prince of Thieves / Chuck Hogan (2010)

Never Let Me Go / Kazuo Ishiguro  (2010)

On the road / Jack Kerouac.  (2012)

Gideon’s Gift / Karen Kingsbury  (2010)

Girl with the Dragon Tattoo / Steig Larsson (2011)

Shutter Island / Dennis Lehane  (2010)

Freaky Deaky / Elmore Leonard. (2012)

Robert Ludlum’s The Bourne legacy / Eric Van Lustbader (2012)

Kick-Ass (comics) / Mark Millar  (2010)

Cloud atlas / David Mitchell.  (2012)

One Day / David Nicholls  (2011)

Cross / James Patterson.  (2012)

True Grit / Charles Portis   (2010)

Atlas Shrugged / Ayn Rand  (2011)

Drive / James Sallis  (2011)

We Need to Talk About Kevin / Lionel Shriver  (2011)

Dear John / Nicholas Sparks   (2010)

The lucky one / Nicholas Sparks.  (2012)

Safe haven / Nicholas Sparks.  (2013)

The help / Kathryn Stockett.  (2011)

The Rum Diary (2011) / Hunter S. Thompson

The Killer Inside Me / Jim Thompson  (2010)

The mysterious island / Jules Verne  (2012)